CLOSING TIMES –THE SEQUEL
     

    You may have looked at the page “Closing Times” and noted
    the sad state of some of the area’s pub stock. Sadly, there is more, because
    one of Cleethorpes’ one-time popular pubs (Leaking Boot) was demolished following a fire and
    hasn't  been replaced. One has been converted to flats (Longship); one converted to a medical centre (Lynton) with convenience store and two others to convenience stores. Conversion to shop use is becoming a national worry as there is no law to prevent it due to shops and pubs being regarded as the same kind of premises. Because of this they are being targeted by supermarket chains.

    CLEETHORPES


    Leaking Boot (Darley's), Grimsby Road

    Plans for this desolate wasteland have come to nothing. A pub would have been nice but plans have been approved for housing development. 




    Lifeboat, Kingsway

    Clearly no longer a pub! Once thronging with visitors in summer, it seems like it was worth more to sell it to developers.



    Queens Hotel, Sea View Street

    Now divided into a series of boutique shops, the narrow street still manages to accommodate two thriving pubs. Note the "G" at roof level, denoting original owners Gilmour of Sheffield


    Manhattan Bar North Promenade

    Many will have forgotten this pub, situated alongside the steps from the station approach .A one-roomer, it rejoiced under various names including Sands, Dapperz and Limits. Clearly there became a limit because it now appears to have no obvious use.


    Lynton, Taylor's Avenue

    It seems all shop in this view but there is a medical centre at the rear.



    GRIMSBY

    Longship, Macaulay Street

    Not exactly a tribute to the architect's art. Functional I think they call it.



    Gunner's Watch, Broadway

    The only pub on the estate couldn't make a go of it, although it was successful when it first opened.





    Market Hotel, Yarborough Road/Cromwell Road


    Yes, it still looks like a pub but is now a Tesco Extra and severe restrictions were placed by planning officers on its conversion by the planning authorities. It stands as an example of between-wars design. Sadly, the sign of its former owners Hewitt's Brewery has been painted over. It may be discerned above the window in the centre.


     
    Ropewalk, Heneage Road

    Sadly nothing remains of the pub which this building replaced. It now has probably more people inside than it did on an avarage evening. A care home has replaced it.






    Royal Oak, Victoria Street South

    This fine looking building survived the construction of a major road junction only to become the HQ of an estate agent.



    Friar Tuck, Freshney Place

    A casualty of the remodelled Freshney Place shopping centre. Although part of the original, a pub wasn't considered appropriate and was converted to a shop.


    Humber, Cleethorpe Road/Humber Street

    A once thriving pub close to the fish dock entrance now a commercial property.


    Kent Arms, Kent Street

    Originally a popular Kent Street pub with the fishing fraternity and the local community. Latterly a John Smith's house with a caring landlord and still displays the "Welcome" logo in the entrance porch. The large 'W' formed a part of the logo of original owners. brewers Warwick and Richardson.



    Palace Buffet, Victoria Street North

    Now a branch of Carphone Warehouse ,this imposing building was the refreshment room for the adjacent Palace Theatre which regularly featured famous acts. The gap shows where the theatre stood and where there is a display of the originally tiling.



    White Knight, Thesiger Street

    Whilst this place remains standing, it is surrounded by dereliction and seems unlikely to survive demolition.


    HOLTON LE CLAY

    Etherington Arms

    One of only two pubs in the village, although since ceasing life as a pub, a trendy bar has opened almost next door. The "Ethers" is now a community hall.